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Goddess Sekhmet18th Dynasty, reign of Amenhotep III (app. 1390-1352 BC)

Sekhmet was a lion goddess whose name means ‘the mighty one’, and she personified the aggressive aspects of other goddesses. Sekhmet was a daughter of the sun-god Ra and she usually wears a sun-disc on her head. 

Myth recounts how she almost obliterated humankind for conspiring against her father’s rule. She was associated with destruction and plague, but her powers could also be invoked for healing. Like other goddesses, she often holds a looped cross and papyrus stalk; emblems of life (ankh) and flourishing (wadj).

  

The Library of Lost Books’ exhibition in the new Birmingham Library is opening soon! I had the privilege of reworking one of their books, which will be included in the exhibition. LoLB asks whether Birmingham Library will be censured or praised for letting them turn their unwanted books into art- What do you think?
Read their blog here!

Installation view of three pieces of work as part of the ‘Parallax’ Exhibition:

Hóngbāo‘: Drawings, Red Envelopes (2013) ‘Hóngbāo’ is documentation of the performance during which visitors are gifted with a red envelope containing a unique drawing from a recent newspaper image.  In Chinese and other Asian societies, a red envelope or red packet is a monetary gift which is given during holidays or special occasions. Red envelopes are mainly presented at social and family gatherings. The red color of the envelope symbolizes good luck and is supposed to ward off evil spirits.

Facekini‘: Video (2013)

‘Small Worlds’: Newsprint, Snow Globes (2013)

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